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Turkish soap operas in the Arab world: social liberation or cultural alienation?

Noor and Muhannad from the Arabized Turkish soap opera Noor

Alexandra Buccianti looks at the Turkish soap opera phenomenon as a successful model of hybridization and sets it against the background of Turkey's historical role in the Arab world

From Saints to Sinners: Identity and celebrity in a contemporary Iranian television serial

Narges prays in a white chador

The Iranian television drama Narges was a smash hit in 2006, but the action wasn’t just on screen. Josie Delap examines the relationships between the stars’ on-air characters and their private personas, including a sex tape scandal that roiled the Iranian authorities.

Syria under the Spotlight: Television satire that is revolutionary in form, reformist in content

Marlin Dick traces the origins and behind the scenes drama of the Syrian sketch comedy program Spotlight.
(Features Video)

Television and the Ethnographic Endeavor: The Case of Syrian DramaIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Customers in a Cairo watch musalsalat during Ramadan.  Photograph by Tara Todras-Whitehill.

In contemporary Syria, the TV industry’s centrality renders it a particularly revealing site of ethnographic endeavor. It provides a valuable point of access to a complex and rapidly changing society, argues Christa Salamandra.